Mystery Author Spotlight – Roland Clarke

Introducing May’s Mystery Author, Roland Clarke!

It’s not often I run into other writers of equestrian-themed mysteries. Admittedly, we are a rare breed! So I was delighted to learn of Roland Clarke’s novel, Spiral of Hooves, a mystery set in the world of eventing. Our similarities extend beyond a love of mysteries and horses, though. Like me, Roland also writes about many other subjects. I was intrigued to learn he is a former green activist, a theme which pours over into many of his works. So, I’m excited to feature Roland and his books on my blog today.

Author Bio

P1000002After diverse careers, Roland Clarke was an equestrian journalist and green activist when chronic illness hastened retirement. But he hasn’t stopped exploring rabbit holes and writing – mainly mystery novels and varied shorts. Roland and his wife – both avid gamers – now live in Idaho (USA) with their four fur-babies, although their hearts are in North Wales (UK). Learn more on his WEBSITE.

The Interview

Hi Roland! What attracts you to writing in the mystery genre?

Writing mysteries allows me to explore devious solutions to problems – and challenge my MC…and the reader. I could do that in other genres, and as a teenager, I wrote SF/Fantasy with twists – and red herrings. So, over the decades I have slipped mysteries into other genres I’ve tackled, like my Viking Age alternative history or my post-apocalyptic saga. However, the mystery is always at the core and usually, a crime must be solved or prevented. Also, writing a believable mystery-solving MC with a difference is a challenge – as is creating a motivated antagonist who believes his/her actions are justified.

What subjects do you enjoy writing about the most? 

Beyond the mysteries, I enjoy writing about issues that challenge my characters, who often are struggling with themselves – whether with health or identity. I’ve been interested in history for decades, so that leads me to research rabbit holes like Deaf culture, Special Forces in Afghanistan, PTSD, Viking shipbuilding, or the last Prince of Wales, Owain Glyndwr. Of course, horses gallop throughout my writing, not surprisingly for an ex-equestrian journalist.

Moreover, environmental issues are a common thread. I was a green activist for many years, and I try to continue spreading the message in my writing. So, genetic modification, organic agriculture, renewable energy, the arms trade, air pollution, and airships feature as key plot elements wherever they fit the story.

Green issues played a central role in Spiral of Hooves, my first published novel and a mystery set against the sports horse world I worked in. A researcher with a traumatic past and a young rider with diabetes unravel a plot to manipulate the breeding of competition horses. From PTSD and diabetes to LGBTQ and Deaf Culture, I’m interested in representing ‘diverse’ characters and human rights issues. This concern preceded my disability.

What are you working on now?

For a number of years, I’ve been working on Snowdon Shadows, a crime series set around Snowdonia in North Wales and featuring Sparkle Anwyl, a queer Welsh policewoman – or Heddlu as the police in Wales are called. Queer as in her mnemonic mind games to resolve crimes and in her lesbian relationship with a fellow officer of color. The original story, Fates Maelstrom, was written in 2012. Set in SW England, it did not feature a detective, but I re-wrote it set in Snowdonia with Sparkle Anwyl assigned as a junior officer on the case. In the novel, which is currently being edited, Sparkle must use memories of old cases to unravel why ex-mercenaries are involved in the illegal trade in horsemeat.

Fates Maelstrom will be Book 2 of the Snowdon Shadows crime series, with two more Books drafted.

Is the setting of your novel based on a real place?

My Snowdon Shadows series is set around Snowdonia in North Wales, where my wife and I lived for a few years before moving to the USA. All the places are real, with a few exceptions like the locality where my MC’s maternal family has farmed for generations – although that is based on typical Welsh farms and villages.

Our hearts are still in North Wales, and in our office, we have a photo canvas of Snowdon my wife took from our home in Harlech. Detective Sparkle Anwyl keeps my memories of Wales alive, especially when I learn more about the area or when ‘driving’ on familiar and unfamiliar roads in Google Maps. I incorporate both places we visited or would have done if we were still there.

Do you have any upcoming releases you’d like to tell us about?

My short story Feathered Fire is featured in VOYAGERS: The Third Ghost, the fifth Insecure Writers Support Group Anthology, which released on May 5, 2020. I was hesitant about entering last year, having tried three times unsuccessfully – and it was for Middle Grade historical fantasy. However, the writer who created IWSG encouraged me to enter.

From my research rabbit warren, I melded brave Soviet Airwomen in WWII and rich Slavic folklore into a tale the judges liked. A mystery as I was way off my genre. Or was I? Perhaps the young heroine Vasy needed to discover, “Why she had survived?”
You can read more about the tale and its trigger HERE.

719iAAmPL1L

Congratulations on making it into the Anthology, Roland! It sounds like your persistence has paid off. Thank you for being a guest on my blog. 

Thanks, readers, for stopping by and getting to know Roland Clarke. Please check back next month, when I’ll feature another deserving mystery writer.

Are Tiny Houses Creepy?

Tiny House Plaid Zebra

With the final book in my YA mystery series published and my latest psychological suspense manuscript sent off to my agent (hooray!), I’ve begun major revisions on another suspense manuscript I wrote last year. The story is partially set in a tiny house in northern Michigan. My latest round of revisions comes after receiving feedback from a few editors who thought the twists and turns at the end of the story weren’t “big” enough. I’m working on fixing that. They had positive feedback, too, and I was struck by one observation made by more than one editor–the tiny house made for a creepy setting.

While I was happy to hear the setting unnerved them (the novel involves an older widow who begins to believe her new best friend in the tiny house might be a murderer.) Still, I’d never thought of tiny houses as being inherently creepy. Admittedly, my knowledge of tiny houses comes mostly from watching episodes of Tiny House Nation on the FYI network. I originally placed the character in the tiny house to emphasize her free spirit, nomadic lifestyle, and belief in minimalist living.

The more I think about it, however, those editors might have been right about the creepiness factor. It’s something I’m going to play up in the next draft of my manuscript. For example, why would the young woman choose to live in a house on wheels? Maybe to make a quick getaway? Is she running from someone or something? And then there are all those secret compartments–drawers hidden in the sides of staircases, tables that fold out from the wall, storage bins built underneath the bed. What’s she hiding? At one point, her friend even observes, “My, you have plenty of hiding places. Don’t you?” And, in case you’re wondering…Yes. She is hiding something.

Aside from the abundance of hiding places, there’s also the sheer claustrophobia that might come with living inside a 200 square-foot space. I’m all for paring down my material possessions, but I’m not sure I could live in a house smaller than my modest-sized living room. There’s literally nowhere to run or hide.

Finally, the location where the tiny house is parked comes into play. In my story, it’s parked on field next door to a lonely widow’s farmhouse. The farmhouse is located on a ten-acre parcel of land “out in the boonies,” as the widow describes it. Maybe the house would have different vibe if it were parked in town next to a park? Or overlooking the ocean? I placed it in a remote location purposefully, to add a sense of foreboding to the story.

While I plan give an even more mysterious vibe to the tiny house in my story, my underlying view of tiny houses probably won’t change. Tiny houses are cool! Okay, maybe once in a while they can be creepy. What do you think?

Dark Horse Series (2nd Edition) Just Released!

Hi all,

It’s hard to believe that summer is wrapping up and fall is in the air. I’ve been working on a BIG project all summer, and I’m happy to say that it is two-thirds complete! Last spring, I took back the rights to my Dark Horse YA Mystery series in order to make some revisions and gain more control over the marketing of my books. The series was re-released on Amazon a few days ago, and is now available in Kindle and paperback versions, and FREE for Kindle Unlimited readers! These are the perfect quick and thrilling reads to wrap up your summer! While the new versions are similar to the old ones, the revised mysteries are now fully appropriate for ages 12 and up.

So, what’s the other one-third of my project? The third (and final) book in this YA mystery series is in the works. I’m over halfway done with the first draft and am happy with the way the story is shaping up. I’m excited to announce that Cabin 5 (Dark Horse, Book Three) will be releasing winter 2020! I already have the cover and can’t wait to share it with you when it gets closer to the release date.

In less exciting news, my backyard vegetable garden is in full production mode. My husband and I are having a competition to see how many tomatoes we can eat every day. Any other veggie lovers out there? Here’s a quick photo of a recent morning’s harvest. Let’s enjoy the fresh produce while we can!

Mystery Thriller Week Author Spotlight: Linda Kane

Welcome back to my Mystery Thriller Week Author Spotlight series. Today I’m pleased to welcome another fellow horse lover to my blog–Author Linda Kane!

linda-kane-headshot

Linda L. Kane MA in Education, PPS, School Psychologist, and Learning Disability Specialist, is the author of The Black Madonna, Witch Number is Which, Icelandia, Katterina Ballerina, Cowboy Jack and Buddy Save Santa, and Chilled to the Bones, 2017 release date, Clyde: Lost and Now Found, and Bottoms Up, A Daisy Murphy Mystery. She lives with her husband and three dogs and six horses.

 

And here’s her newest release,Chilled to the Bones, a young adult historical mystery set in Setauket, New York.

linda-kane-1

Author Interview:

Hi Linda! When did you first know that you wanted to become a writer?

I grew up in a very poor area where violence was common place. For me, writing and drawing was a means of escape. So, I guess, always.

If you could spend the day with any character from your novel, who would it be? Why?

Dealer, she’s a good kid, with a great heart who wants to help her father with his problems and save their home. I would want to know what makes her so strong, so resilient in the face of so much tragedy.

Is writing your full-time job? If not, what else do you do?

I am retired now and my full time job is writing and painting. My artwork has been at an art museum and is at a gallery in Pacific Grove, Ca.

What are your hobbies outside of writing?

My hobby and my love are my dogs and horses. I have four American Saddlebreds, one hackney pony, and one quarter horse. I compete nationally and my horse, Into the Cosmos is a national champion. I have three Australian shepherds that are smarter than I am and I have to work to keep up with them.

What are you working on now?

Actually I am working on a children’s story about a mini pony that was abandoned (true story), in an orchard. Our barn adopted Clyde. He was skinny, he had a broken jaw, a little timid, you should see him now. Love and food heal quite a bit.  I’m finishing up the editing for the first of a series of murder mystery books titled, Bottoms Up, A Daisy Murphy Mystery. I’m also working on a historical book regarding a man who people thought was the answer to their problems but found out to late that he was a monster, and the young people who stood against at the cost of their own lives. I am also working on a sequel to The Black Madonna and Chilled to The Bones.

Thank you for inviting me to your blog, it’s been a pleasure and I’ve enjoyed your amazing questions.

You’re welcome, Linda. It has been fun getting to know more about you and your books!

Thanks for reading…Please stay tuned for my next MTW Author Spotlight with thriller author Christina Hoag!

Mystery Thriller Week Author Spotlight: Sarah Key

Today is the first official day of MYSTERY THRILLER WEEK and I’m pleased to welcome thriller author Sarah Key to my blog. I’m sure you’ll find Sarah’s unique background as fascinating and impressive as I do. Please read more about her and books…

sarah-14-of-182644Sarah Key’s working life has followed many paths; English teacher, Adult Educator, HIV and AIDS activist, mentor to apprentice jockeys and writer. She holds a Masters Degree in Adult Education and her research report focused on perspective transformation for tolerance education.

Sarah is passionate about the rich cultural diversity of her country and has gathered many powerful narratives from a range of personalities including Apartheid resistors, Holocaust survivors, initiates from a rural circumcision school and survivors of sexual abuse.

Her novels are gritty, grisly psychological thrillers set in Southern Africa with its blends of old and new, mystical and modern, city and country. Aside from being entertaining and exploring deviance in its many guises, they attempt to challenge notions and shatter taboos surrounding sensitive cultural issues.

In 2011 Sarah began her journey writing fiction and is published by Rebele Publishers (Detroit). She is currently completing the final book in The Sisters of Light trilogy.  Sarah is married and lives in Johannesburg, South Africa, with her husband and two daughters. Connect with Sarah on FACEBOOK and GOODREADS.

cover-weeds2645Back Cover Blurb:  When lives collide, and time runs out, will there be a final chance for redemption?

Aden Cassalotti, damaged by childhood trauma, tragedies and disappointments, is financially and emotionally insolvent and seeks solace in a crack pipe.

Volatile Noel Schuurman, Aden’s lifelong friend and business partner, feels neglected living out of town running their marijuana and magic mushroom operation. The brooding recluse has killed before and, with escalating pressures, not even his mother and sister are safe on their isolated plot.

Aden takes a job with a ruthless criminal enterprise in an urban slum where dope and flesh are pedaled. He encounters Mandipa Ndlovu, who is being held with other sex slaves waiting to be sent to work.

Kgotso Shelile and his cousin, Senatla, search for Mandipa, Kgotso’s abducted girlfriend. In the underbelly of Johannesburg, they encounter Aden. Having grown up together, the men share an immediate bond and, when fate throws the three together in a Hillbrow strip club, the potential for peril is fraught with danger.

Key’s debut psychological thriller, Tangled Weeds, is sure to get your pulse racing.

Author Interview:

When did you first know that you wanted to become a writer?

I was about 11 and walking in the bushveld with my father. We came across an abandoned tumbled-downed house. My imagination took flight and I told him that I wanted to write a book filled with villains, robbers and smugglers. That realisation has never left me.

If you could spend the day with any character from your novel, who would it be? Why?

My antagonists are downright twisted and malevolent so if I had to spend a day with a character it would be one of the Sisters of Light and probably Joanie Parks, a young artist whose background story is fully explored in The Butterfly Wind. Joanie is complex, confrontational and feisty and harbors a shameful secret. She’s also fiercely loyal and grapples with her own insecurities and need to be loved. Joanie is fun and fearless. I would have to be twenty five years younger, though, to keep up with her antics!

If your book was made into a movie, who do you envision playing the leading roles?

I feel that my debut novel, Tangled Weeds would translate well into a mini-series.  It is a graphic thriller set between Zimbabwe, the fertile farmlands of the then Northern Province of South Africa known for its cultivation of mangoes and litchis, and Hillbrow, an urban slum.

Aden Cassalotti is a complex character who becomes addicted to crack cocaine. To support his drug dependency he takes a job with a deadly sex trafficking ring and gets much more than he bargained for…

I’m not very up to date on movies and movies stars, preferring to read books. The South African accent is one that presents actors with a huge challenge. In Invictus, a 2009 sports drama about Nelson Mandela and events surrounding the 1995 rugby world cup, Matt Damon did a fair job. With his blond good looks and ability to portray emotion he could give Aden a bash!

What attracts you to writing in the mystery/thriller genre?

We didn’t have television until I was 12 so I grew up listening to dramas on the radio.  My father studied psychology when I was a pre-teen and I was fascinated by his textbooks and poured over pictures of people with anorexia, catatonia and other disorders. I have always been fascinated by the aberrant human mind and have an overactive imagination.

Thrillers are supposed to do just that – thrill. I do not enjoy reading or writing books that are uber violent or horrific having learned that the power of suggestion can just as successfully heighten tension.

With the help of my editor, I have worked hard to incorporate techniques that ensure my readers are gripped and find the experience electrifying. A fast pace and using varied perspectives that allow events to be understood from disparate characters’ points of view (particularly perverse antagonists) keep the pages turning. Enjoyed from the safety of one’s armchair, exploring the dark hearts of humans gone bad can be an exhilarating ride that is far removed from the mundanity of regular life.

What are your hobbies outside of writing?

I enjoy cooking and socialising greatly and keep fit attending a woman’s outdoor bootcamp programme most weekday mornings. I derive great pleasure from my two cross-breed dogs and am kept busy with family responsibilities. I read widely and enjoy travelling particularly locally – South Africa is an amazing, diverse country.

How do you deal with rejections and/or negative reviews?

I haven’t focused much on marketing my books until recently. For the past years I have concentrated on raising our two daughters and getting the stories that are inside me down. I received two or three rejections from local publishers for my first novel, Tangled Weeds. Reading rejection letters is not pleasant – it’s like someone telling you that you have an ugly child!

Writing is a high point in my life’s journey and I had blind faith that my books would be published. Fortunately, I was accepted in 2011 by Rebele Publishers and have never looked back. I have three books published by them and am close to finishing the final book in my trilogy.

My books are enjoying a positive response. Reading is highly subjective so it is unrealistic to expect everyone to like your work and constructive criticism is necessary for improvement. Being a writer, like most jobs in this day and age, requires resilience, determination and a personal passion that drives you to continue.

What time of day do you prefer to write?

In a block in the morning from about 10.00am – 13h00 and then for an hour in the early evening around five or six.

What are you working on now?

I am completing the final book in my Sisters of Light trilogy. It is called The Starlight Tide and follows The Dandelion Clock and The Butterfly Wind.

Which well-known authors have inspired your writing?

I studied English at university and, for a short while, I was an English teacher so I have read  many books that have had a bearing on my writing. For a while I read a glut of Scandinavian crime; Jussi Adler-Olson, Camilla Lackberg, Lars Kepler. I found them atmospheric and try to effectively create mood in my books. Stieg Larsson’s incredible trilogy inspired me to write one.

What subjects do you enjoy writing about most? Why? 

The essential themes I explore in my writing are the conflicts between good and evil. I believe that all people have the choice to take certain life paths. Circumstances and pre-dispositions will, of course, influence their decisions. If a character decides to try drugs, commit a murder or indulge in dark crafts and fantasies, there will be consequences to. Morality, or lack thereof, is a personal decision.

Living in a multicultural society in South Africa – which has an extraordinary history – I use my novels as a lens to explore diversity and different cultural belief systems. I believe that by presenting readers with different perspectives and practices, wrapped in the guise of fiction, a greater level of understanding and tolerance can be achieved.

Thanks for reading! Leave your comments and questions for Sarah here, and stay tuned for my next MTW Author Spotlight with Linda Kane!

Mystery Thriller Week Author Spotlight: Pamela Lazos

Welcome to my fifth Author Spotlight in anticipation of Mystery Thriller Week! Today I’m excited to welcome Pamela Lazos to my blog. It seems Pam and I have a lot in common, from our passion for writing and our concern for the environment to our legal backgrounds and mutual admiration for Matt Damon! Her newest novel, Oil and Water, is sure to appeal to both the environmentally conscious and the mystery buffs among us. Here is more about Pam and her riveting environmental thriller…

pam-lazosPam Lazos is the author of the recently released novel, Oil and Water, an environmental murder mystery about oil spills and green technology; of Six Sisters, a collection of novellas about family and dysfunction; a blogger; on the Editorial Board for the wH2O Journal, the Journal of Gender and Water (U of Penn); a blogger for the Global Water Alliance (GWA) in Philadelphia, a literary magazine contributor; a former correspondent for her local newspaper; former Editor-in-Chief for the Environmental Law and Technology Journal at Temple Law School; a ghostwriter; the author of a children’s book (Into the Land of the Loud); an environmental lawyer; and, because it’s cool, a beekeeper’s apprentice. She practices laughter daily. Learn more on her blog: Green Life Blue Water.

oil-and-waterOil and Water Synopsis: When inventor Martin Tirabi builds a machine that converts trash into oil it sends shockwaves through the corporate halls of the oil cognoscenti. Weeks later, Marty and his wife, Ruth are killed in a mysterious car accident. Their son, Gil, a 10-year old physics prodigy is the only one capable of finishing the machine that could solve the world’s energy problems.  Plagued with epilepsy from birth, Gil is also psychic, and through dreams and the occasional missive from his dead father he gets the push he needs to finish the job.

          Meanwhile, Bicky Coleman, head of Akanabi Oil is doing his best to smear the planet in it. From a slow leak in the Gulf of Mexico to the most devastating oil spill the Delaware River has ever seen, Akanabi’s corporate practices are leaving oily imprints in their wake. To divert the tide of bad press, Bicky dispatches his son-in-law and Chief Engineer, David Hartos to clean up his mess.  A disillusioned Hart, reeling from the recent death of his wife and unborn child, travels to Philadelphia to fulfill his father-in-law’s wishes.

          There’s no such thing as coincidence when Hart meets Gil and agrees to help him finish Marty’s dream machine. But how will he bring such a revolutionary invention to market in a world reliant on fossil fuels and awash in corporate greed?  To do so, Hart must confront those who would quash the project, including his own father-in-law.  

          You’ll find murder, mystery, and humor as black as fine Arabian crude filling the pages of Oil and Water. The characters are fictional, but the technology is real. What will we do when the oil runs out?  

Interview with Pamela Lazos:

Hi Pam! When did you first know that you wanted to become a writer?

I don’t know if it’s something I ever aspired to, but rather, just fell into. I always liked to write, but never really considered it as a career, more of a hobby to keep me out of trouble. It’s only lately that I see writing as a possible second career. Before blogging, though, I wouldn’t have guessed that the possibility could be as great as I think it now is.

If you could spend the day with any character from your novel, who would it be? Why?

Definitely Gil, the 10-year old physics prodigy. I have a hard time even understanding physics so to have that kind of science acumen would be stupendous. I used to do quite well in science in grade school, but started down the slippery slope in high school and struggled to hold onto the concepts in college. I think it’s fantastic that we have all these STEM groups for girls now — science, technology, engineering and math. With that kind of backing, I believe I would have gone more heavily into the sciences. As it stands, I’m an environmental lawyer so I’m kind of science-lite. I have to understand the concepts for work, but have others to turn to who have mastered them. I would much prefer to be an expert, however.

If your book was made into a movie, who do you envision playing the leading roles?

I always want Matt Damon to be everything — ever since I saw “Good Will Hunting” I wanted to work with him — but I’d “settle” for him playing Hart! I see Ian Somerhalder as Bicky, although we’d need a great makeup artist to make him look years older. I don’t know who would play Gil. Problematically, all the young child actors that I admire grow up so quickly. By the time you cast them and the movie is made, a couple years go by and they don’t fit the role anymore. These are definitely problems I’d like to have. :0)

What attracts you to writing in the mystery/thriller genre?

Everyone loves a good mystery. It’s part of human nature. Writing mysteries are exciting because, if you write like I do, you just let your characters go off on a path and you follow them until you see where they’ve gone. It’s great fun and an excellent pastime. 

What time of day do you prefer to write?

I’m at my best in the early hours of the day. I also love to write on the train. I have a long commute to work — about two hours on Amtrak which is a very comfortable train — and it’s perfect for writing.

Which well-known authors have inspired your writing?

I draw inspiration from many places. Love the environmental writers like Rick Bass, Jim Harrison, and Terry Tempest Williams, but I also love the quirky writers like Tom Robbins, and the historical fiction masters like Tim Willocks and Diana Gabaldon. And, of course, there’s the inimitable writers like Stephen King and Anne Lamott.

Thanks for reading…Leave your questions and comments for Pam here, and stay tuned for my next MTW Author Spotlight installment with mystery writer, Anne Carmichael!

 

 

Mystery Thriller Week Author Spotlight: Judy Penz Sheluk

 

Today I’m pleased to welcome Canadian mystery author, Judy Penz Sheluk, to my blog. Although I haven’t read her books (yet!), I’m a fan of any novel with characters fighting to preserve a small town’s historic district from big box stores. I think Judy and I are on the same wavelength! Here’s more about Judy…

judy-penz-sheluk2158Judy Penz Sheluk’s debut mystery novel, The Hanged Man’s Noose: A Glass Dolphin Mystery (Barking Rain Press), was published in July 2015. Skeletons in the Attic (Imajin Books), the first book in her Marketville Mystery Series, was published in August 2016. Her short crime fiction appears in several anthologies and collections. Judy is a member of Sisters in Crime, Crime Writers of Canada, International Thriller Writers and the Short Mystery Fiction Society. Find out more at her website/blog, www.judypenzsheluk.com, where she interviews other authors and blogs about the writing life.

noose2161Back Cover Blurb From The Hanged Man’s Noose:

Small-town secrets and subterfuge lead to murder in this fast-moving, deftly written tale of high-stakes real estate wrangling gone amok.

Journalist Emily Garland lands a plum assignment as the editor of a niche magazine based in Lount’s Landing, a small town named after a colorful 19th century Canadian traitor. As she interviews the local business owners for the magazine, Emily quickly learns that many people are unhappy with real estate mogul Garrett Stonehaven’s plans to convert an old schoolhouse into a mega-box store. At the top of that list is Arabella Carpenter, the outspoken owner of an antiques shop, who will do just about anything to preserve the integrity of the town’s historic Main Street.

But Arabella is not alone in her opposition. Before long, a vocal dissenter at a town hall meeting about the proposed project dies. A few days later, another body is discovered, and although both deaths are ruled accidental, Emily’s journalistic suspicions are aroused.

Putting her reporting skills to the ultimate test, Emily teams up with Arabella to discover the truth behind Stonehaven’s latest scheme before the murderer strikes again.

View all of Judy’s books on Amazon.

Interview with Judy Penz Sheluk:

Thanks for joining me today, Judy! When did you first know that you wanted to become a writer?

I’ve always wanted to write. As a kid, I wrote stories in my head, on the way to school and back again. I thought all kids did that! In 2003, I left the corporate world to try life as a freelance writer. I’ve never looked back. In late 2011, after taking some courses in Creative Writing, I decided to start The Hanged Man’s Noose. It was an instant addiction.

If you could spend the day with any character from your novel, who would it be? Why?

I love Arabella Carpenter. She owns the Glass Dolphin, an antiques shop owner and the sidekick in The Hanged Man’s Noose, the first book in my Glass Dolphin Mystery series. She’s going to be the protagonist in the sequel, and she has a small role in Skeletons in the Attic, the first book in my Marketville series. Arabella is smart, feisty, loves shortbread, chardonnay, and cognac. She’s also loyal to her friends—even her ex-husband, Levon— wears her heart on her sleeve, and firmly believes that authenticity matters in people as well as the antiques she sells.

If your book was made into a movie, who do you envision playing the leading roles?

Jennifer Lawrence for the protagonist in Skeletons in the Attic, Callie Barnstable. Bradley Cooper for her next-door neighbor and possible love interest, Royce Ashford. Chris Noth in the role of Leith Hampton, lawyer.

What attracts you to writing in the mystery/thriller genre?

It’s what I read, and I’m an avid reader – about a book a week and at least 3 or 4 mystery anthologies or collections a year. I try to write what I’d like to read. People ask if it’s difficult to separate the books I read by other authors from my writing, but the reverse is true. A well-written or clever mystery inspires me to try harder. Reading is the best teacher.

How do you deal with rejections and/or negative reviews?

I won’t lie. Rejection hurts, but there isn’t a writer, alive or dead, who hasn’t experienced rejection. When I was shopping for a publisher/agent for The Hanged Man’s Noose, I wrote a heartfelt and honest blog about the experience titled The First Cut is the Deepest. It still gets a lot of hits, as does the series, My Publishing Journey. I’ve also blogged about Learning from Rejection.

Both Noose and Skeletons have primarily good ratings, with an average of 4.18 and 4.34 respectively on Goodreads. When I received my first 1-star review (after a string of 5-star reviews on Amazon) for Skeletons, I was crushed. I went to my fellow Sisters in Crime Guppy group and lamented. I was congratulated for finally making it “into the club.” Apparently readers are leery of a book that only has 5 star reviews. Then I went and looked at the reviews for Gone Girl, and sure enough, among the 5 stars there were a few 1 stars. I felt comforted by that: I should be as successful as Gillian Flynn!

Thank you for sharing your insights, Judy! I know many of us wish we could be as successful as Gillian Flynn. It’s been a pleasure learning more about you and your books.

Check back on February 5th for my next interview with environmental thriller author, Pamela Lazos!